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UPDATED March 1st, 2022

The 130th Maine Legislature began its second session on January 5, 2022. This session will meet until April 20, 2022. While we know that the Senate and House will meet on March 9th at 10 am, the rest of the Legislature’s schedule for March has not yet been released.

Until further notice, all committee meetings will take place via Zoom. You can find these meetings on the Maine Legislature YouTube page. Committee schedules can be found on the Legislature’s Website

Below, you will find a list of the bills that the Christian Civic League follows. We will update this list regularly as the legislature continues toward April. As we move through this session and into an important election year, we urge you to get involved through prayer, participation, or perhaps, even running for a local office. 

If you are interested in following any of these bills, please consider joining our “Rapid Responders” group. Rapid Responders will be notified instantly if a bill we care about suddenly appears on the docket. Rapid Responders are thus equipped to play an important role in Maine’s government. If you would like to join and receive a regular email of weekly items, email Mike McClellan (Policy Director) at policy@cclmaine.org, or call him at 329-6148. 

Check back here periodically for new posts. Visit our Facebook and Twitter accounts to view real-time information. 

CCL Maine recently held two candidate training events to help people learn more about local and statewide elected office. We expect to offer more events in 2022. 

As always, please pray for our Governor, legislators, their staff, and families.

LD 1550
SUPPORT

“An Act To End the Sale of Flavored Tobacco Products”

Sponsor:
Rep. Michele Meyer

House District: #2

Hearing/ Work Session:
Occurred in May & June 2021

Description:
This bill prohibits the sale and distribution of flavored tobacco products, including

flavored cigars and electronic smoking devices.

Concerns:
This bill does not ban tobacco products. It simply prevents them from being flavored in a way that attracts children.

Update:

HHS Committee reported this bill out in 2021 as Ought to Pass. Advocates are trying to get the bill funded in the supplemental budget.

 

867
SUPPORT

“An Act To Prohibit Mandatory COVID-19 Vaccinations for 5 Years To Allow for Safety Testing and Investigations into Reproductive Harm”

Sponsor:
Rep. Tracy Quint

House District: #144

Hearing / Work Session:Neither; this bill has moved on to House /Senate.

Work Session Location:HHS Committee

Description:
This bill prohibits mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations for 5 years.

Concerns:
If it is mandated now, people will receive frivolous medical exemptions because there isn’t enough data for us to determine who needs an exemption and who doesn’t. This creates a precedent of providing medical exemptions for silly reasons, which will undermine our medical institutions.

Update:
This bill was reported out of the committee as “Ought Not to Pass.” The Maine House took this up on February 23rd and voted (76-59 & 13 absent) Ought Not To Pass, on a “partyline” vote. All attending Republicans supported ending mandates, and all attending Democrats voted to continue Maine Government mandates. This bill will move to the ( it will move to the Maine House and Maine State Senate.

 LD 344
OPPOSE

 “RESOLUTION, Proposing an Amendment to the Constitution of Maine To Explicitly Prohibit Discrimination Based on the Sex of an Individual”

Sponsor:
Rep. Lois Reckitt

House District: #31

Hearing / Work Session:
Neither; this bill has moved on to the House / Senate.

Work Session Location:
Judiciary Committee

Update:
This bill failed to pass in the House. It also failed to pass in the State Senate,so it will return to the House for a final vote.

Description:
We do not have the language of the proposed legislation, other than the title. Note: this is a constitutional amendment. This means it needs a higher vote to pass in the House and Senate. If it passes those legislative bodies, it will not change the Maine Constitution until Maine Citizens passed it.

 

Concerns:
We believe this bill is not about women’s rights. Other states have used it to enshrine abortion rights into their state Constitution. It would also have other consequences, such as requiring mixed-gender sports teams or prisons.

LD 1175
OPPOSE

 

“An Act To Prohibit Excessive Telephone, Video and Commissary Charges in Maine Jails and Prisons”

Sponsor:
Rep. MaryAnne Kinney

House District: #99

Update:
Tabled on Feb. 17th. Still not reported out of committee.

Description:
This will reduce phone call prices, end unnecessary fees, and require better phone contract negotiation on the part of the state to ensure that inmates in state prisons can more easily call their families.

Concerns:
Certainly, people sentenced should follow through to regain their place in society. However, it would not be appropriate to add higher fees to services they rely on–especially given how important it is to encourage outside contact during a rehabilitation effort.

LD 1771
OPPOSE

 

“Resolve, To Establish the Advisory Panel To Better Understand and Make Recommendations Regarding the Implications of Genome-editing Technology for the Citizens of the State”

Sponsor:
Rep. Samuel Zager

House District: #41

Update:

Concerns:

If the wrong people are chosen for this panel, then official government recommendations will endorse the wrong side of what is ultimately a religious debate, thus establishing religion.

Talking Points:

This is a dangerous topic and needs much thought.

Who are the people to staff this study?

What mix of scientists and theologians would be considered?

LD 1582
OPPOSE

“An Act To Enact the Maine Psilocybin Services Act”

Sponsor:
Sen. Donna Bailey

House District: #31

Update:

Concerns:

This bill enacts the Maine Psilocybin Services Act, which establishes a regulatory framework in order to provide psilocybin products to clients in Maine.

Psychedelics are a class of hallucinogenic drugs whose primary effect is to trigger non-ordinary states of consciousness via serotonin 2A receptor agonism. This causes specific psychological, visual, and auditory changes and often a substantially altered state of consciousness. This presents as a medical option, but it is in fact a recreational option. The research is not in on this mushroom. The research proponents point to admit; the research is not ready. This bill is heading to a Work Session.

Talking Points:

How is this good for society?

Research on this is incomplete.

Would allowing Maine citizens to “tune out” cause many issues, from their safety to the safety of others in the community?

LD 1529
OPPOSE

 

“RESOLUTION,
Proposing an Amendment to the Constitution of Maine To Create a Right to Privacy”

Sponsor:
Rep. Margaret O’Neil

House District: #15

Work Session:
Work Session

Work Session Location:

Update:
This bill has been tabled in committee. It could be brought back this legislative session, but we’re not sure.

Description:
This resolution proposes to amend the Constitution of Maine by creating a natural and inherent right to privacy, in which a person’s personal life and affairs are free from governmental and private intrusion and are not diminished by a person’s interaction with an internet, communication, or another electronic data service. This bill is in the Work Session stage.

Concerns:
Most often, bills have titles that sound good but are unclear as to all the bill purposes. Constitutional Amendments are hard to pass as they need two-thirds vote of both the House and Senate and the Governor’s support. It then goes to a vote of the Maine citizens. When we consider this bill, we fear it would hinder law enforcement, and in particular, human trafficking enforcement. We also, again, see this bill as a backdoor to enshrining abortion rights and abortion funding in the Maine Constitution.

Talking Points:
Is this another attempt to put abortion rights and abortion funding in the Maine Constitution? Would this hinder law enforcement, particularly in terms of trafficking? Technology is moving fast, but aren’t there enough laws on privacy already? Wouldn’t updates and enforcements be a better move than a Constitutional Amendment? 

LD 1909
OPPOSE

“An Act To Remove Restrictions on Syringe Service Programs”

Sponsor:
Rep. Genevieve McDonald

House District: #134 

Update: Moving to the Work Session after 2/1/2022 Public Hearing

Description:
This bill prohibits a hypodermic apparatus exchange program from limiting the distribution of hypodermic apparatuses to program participants or requiring the exchange of used hypodermic apparatuses.

Concerns:
The Christian Civic League has many concerns. This bill would create a situation of no limits on required distribution. It doesn’t just “remove restrictions.” The bill would prevent programs from restricting how many syringes can be given to an individual. So, can I walk in and ask for all the syringes you have? Can I walk in and ask for a year’s supply? How do we protect against someone walking in for a significant amount and then selling them on the streets? Finally, as we read this, we see that with LD 1909, a situation develops that affects control of the resources. Currently, the Executive branch is able to adapt to changing circumstances. This bill, when passed, would prevent them from doing so. Does this bill lock us into one path?

LD 1909 is moving to the Work Session after the 2/1/2022 Public Hearing.

Talking Points:
There are no limits on how many syringes you can get.

Proponents may think this is efficient, but actually, shouldn’t we want people using strong medications to see a medical professional as another safety net?

Will the product be taken and sold on the streets?

Does this mean the government can have control of syringes without another law?

LD 1927
OPPOSE

 “An Act to Authorize Certain Off-premises Sales of Adult Use Marijuana”

Sponsor:
Rep. Kathleen Dillingham 

House District: #72

Hearing / Work Session:
Public Hearing

Hearing / Work Session Date: 
Feb. 25, 2022

Hearing / Work Session Time:      1:00 P.M.

Hearing / Work Session Location: Veterans and Legal Affairs

Description:
This bill allows cannabis stores to sell marijuana outside of their stores, given certain requirements.

Concerns:
This would take marijuana out into the general marketplace, to be treated and advertised as one harmless product among many. It also prematurely interferes with regulatory framework. If current law is changed too quickly, agencies will have difficulty enforcing it.

Update:
Work Session.

Talking Points:
Marijuana remains a dangerous drug.             Off-premises sales risk marijuana propagation. It is too soon & difficult to oversee. It is important for those enforcing marijuana’s regulatory framework to have time to develop habits regarding proper enforcement. This bill undermines local sovereignty.

LD 1888
SUPPORT

“An Act To Amend the Laws Affecting Sex Offenders and Petitions for Child Custody”

Sponsor:
Rep. Lori Gramlich

House District: #13

Hearing / Work Session: Work Session.

Hearing / Work Session Location: Judiciary Committee

Description:
Right now, sex offenders are only punished if the child is under 15. This bill raises the age to 18. Also, nothing ensures right now that laws against sex offenders in Maine apply to criminals who move here from elsewhere. This bill changes that. It also allows courts to stop them, if needed, from visiting children.

Concerns:
We support the intent, and want the committee to take the time to make sure they do not cause unintended consequences. 

Update:
This is currently in the work session process. It was tabled and will likely come up again.

Talking Points:
A sex crime against a fourteen-year-old is just as bad as one committed against a fifteen-year-old. Our laws should reflect that.

This protects children from sex offenders who try to use visitation rights to abuse them.

There are many ways to get involved!

For more information on how to become involved, e-mail Mike McClellan at policy@cclmaine.org.
If you’d like a printable copy of this page, e-mail admin@cclmaine.org